Thermostat FAQ’s

 

  1. Why do I need a floor heating thermostat?
  2. How do Wi-Fi thermostats work?
  3. Which thermostats are Wi-Fi enabled?
  4. Where can I download the app needed to connect my Wi-Fi thermostat?
  5. Can I connect my Wi-Fi thermostat to Nest, a home automation system (HAS) or to a home assistant like Google Home or Alexa?
  6. What does “GFCI Class A” mean?
  7. Can I use a GFCI breaker with the thermostat even though it’s built in to the stat?
  8. Can I connect my floor heating system to a new or existing thermostat that controls my furnace or air conditioner?
  9. Can a thermostat read air AND floor temperature? Is one recommended or better than the other?
  10. What is the best location to install my thermostat?
  11. My floor no longer heats up. Does this mean the floor heating wires broke?
  12. I need to replace an old thermostat. Will the new thermostats work with my older system?
  13. How do I install a new floor heating thermostat?
  14. Can I get a replacement faceplate if my thermostat is not working correctly?
  15. Can one thermostat control two or more heating mats or cables?
  16. Why can’t I connect more mats to one thermostat?
  17. Can a thermostat run two mats or cables at different times/temperatures?
  18. What does it mean for a thermostat to be “dual voltage”?
  19. Can mats of different voltages be controlled by the same thermostat, since the thermostats are dual voltage?

Why do I need a floor heating thermostat?

A floor heating thermostat regulates the temperature of your electric radiant floor heating system within safe limits. The models we offer are specifically designed to provide optimal control and safety for the electric radiant floor heating products we carry. Unlike thermostats for HVAC and other systems, our floor heating thermostats are designed to handle line voltage (either 120V or 240V). Additionally, floor heating thermostats have built-in:

  • Class A GFCIs
    • Required for all electric radiant floor heating systems
  • Floor sensors
    • Required by code in most areas and are the best way to monitor temperature
  • Air-sensing modes
    • Acts as a secondary sensor to monitor the air temperature, or a primary sensor if the floor sensor is damaged

How do Wi-Fi thermostats work?

Wi-Fi thermostats connect to your home Wi-Fi and enable you to control many of your floor heating system’s functions, depending on the model. They can be conveniently controlled via the manufacturer’s app for either Apple or Android devices, or from a web portal on your browser. Wi-Fi thermostat control is limited to setting the minimum or maximum temperature, and activating and deactivating a program. They cannot remotely turn the floor heating system on or off, but can enable warm weather shutdown to ensure your floor heating system doesn’t run when your home’s outdoor or indoor temperatures rise. With their convenient features, Wi-Fi thermostats are ideal for vacation homes or to track energy usage.

For more information, check out our Knowledge Center article “‘What makes the new floor heating thermostats better?

Which thermostats are Wi-Fi enabled?

Warm Your Floor currently offers three Wi-Fi-enabled thermostats: the SunTouch SunStat Connect, Nuheat Signature (which works with Nest), and the QuietWarmth Smart Touch Programmable thermostat with Wi-Fi connectivity.

Where can I download the app needed to connect my Wi-Fi thermostat?

For the Wi-Fi thermostats we sell, we’ve compiled a list of links to help you get started downloading the right app for your thermostat and your device.

Can I connect my Wi-Fi thermostat to Nest, a home automation system (HAS) or to a home assistant like Google Home or Alexa?

Yes, but control is somewhat limited.

Google Home and Amazon Alexa don’t currently work directly with any floor heating thermostat. However, Nest does work with the Nuheat Signature thermostat.

In some cases, HAS systems can work with wired dry contact. Wired dry contact is a low-voltage connection between the HAS and the thermostat that allows you to switch between the thermostat’s regular heating setting and an Away setting.

Today, the best solution is to use your HAS’s available Wi-Fi app or web portal until future possible integrations are built.

For additional information, see our Knowledge Center article “Home Automation Systems (HAS) & Floor Heat Thermostats.” (Link TBA).

What does “GFCI Class A” mean?

GFCI stands for “ground fault circuit interrupter.” It is a safety device that interrupts power to your radiant floor heating system, for example, in the event of damage to a wire. GFCIs are likely already in your home, as they are required for electrical outlets in most North American bathrooms and kitchens. Electric code also requires GFCIs for the majority of floor heating applications. All thermostats sold by Warm Your Floor have built-in GFCI protection.

Class A means that if a fault (a current traveling on an unintended path) is detected, the GFCI shuts off power with as little leakage as 5 mA. A GFCI can be reset easily on the thermostat should there be a nuisance trip.

Can I use a GFCI breaker with the thermostat even though it’s built in to the stat?

No. Be sure to use a regular circuit breaker or you may experience a cold floor due to repeated tripping of the thermostat’s GFCI, which will shut it down. Remember: a dedicated circuit + regular circuit breaker = perfect install.

Also, combining two GFCI devices (for example, using two thermostats, or combining an outlet and a thermostat) will likely cause one or both to trip repeatedly. While there are ways to wire this, it is not recommended, as the GFCIs in thermostats are very sensitive.

Can I connect my floor heating system to a new or existing thermostat that controls my furnace or air conditioner?

No. Our thermostats, which handle the required line voltage capability, have dedicated circuits of 120 or 240 volts depending on the system. (Note: HVAC thermostats are only 24 volts.) While there are line voltage thermostats that cost less, such as those used for a baseboard heater, they don’t have floor sensors and would require a 5 mA GFCI breaker, which makes the sensor more expensive in the end.

Can a thermostat read air AND floor temperature? Is one recommended or better than the other?

Floor temperature sensing is the most accurate and therefore recommended method.

All current thermostat models have an air-sensing option, and while some have combinations of features (see the product details for each thermostat), the National Electric Code (NEC) recommends that the floor temperature be monitored. The old “regulators” have been discontinued for years, and dimmer switches or on/off light switches (even when protected by a GFCI breaker) are not recommended, and are a code violation in most areas.

What is the best location to install my thermostat?

The best location to install a floor heating thermostat is in the room where floor heating is being controlled. Positioning the thermostat directly over the heated area is ideal. Of course, homeowner preference, the room’s aesthetics, and the availability of power can be considered. If the thermostat is over the heated floor, installation is easier, and it is easy to change to an effective air-sensing mode function, since the thermostat can sense the air temperature directly over the heated area. This is helpful in case the floor sensor was forgotten or is damaged, or if you want to engage air mode with a floor limit.

My floor no longer heats up. Does this mean the floor heating wires broke?

If you did not remove tiles, cut a hole in your floor, or otherwise disturb your floor heating, it is highly unlikely that the wires broke. Simply reset your thermostat, or replace an old thermostat it if it’s been installed for many years.

For additional information on how to troubleshoot your thermostat, visit our Knowledge Center.

I need to replace an old thermostat. Will the new thermostats work with my older system?

Yes, all the new thermostats are compatible with older mats, cables, and sensor wires.

Simply turn off the breaker, unwire the old thermostat, wire the new thermostat, and turn the power back on. Your system will work like new. (See instructional photos under “How do I install a new floor heating thermostat?” below.)

How do I install a new floor heating thermostat?

Upgrading your thermostat is easy when you follow these simple steps.

For more specific instructions, please consult the manufacturer’s installation guide provided with your new thermostat.

Can’t find the manual? Find and download your thermostat manual here.

Can I get a replacement faceplate if my thermostat is not working correctly?

No, you must replace the entire thermostat. The two parts of each thermostat are made together, and the manufacturer only supplies them in sets.

But keep in mind, replacing the faceplate may not solve the problem anyway. Thermostat errors usually start in the back panel of the device or in both the faceplate and the back panel. Very rarely is there an issue with the faceplate only, but when troubleshooting, we will advise you if it’s an option.

If you are receiving an error message or your thermostat does not work properly, first contact the manufacturer for help. If your product is still under warranty, contact the manufacturer and they will replace it for you or give you a claim number you can use to get a replacement from us.

Can one thermostat control two or more heating mats or cables?

Yes. You can connect up to three mats or cables to one thermostat if their combined draw is less than 15 amps, which totals about 150 sq. ft. of heated area for a 120V system and 300 sq. ft. for 240V system.

Why can’t I connect more mats to one thermostat?

Technically, you can connect an unlimited number of mats, up to the maximum amp load of the thermostat/circuit. But the National Electric Code (NEC) and practicality limit that to two or three connections. There are safety rules (aka the NEC) and common-sense limits to how many wires fit into an electrical box. Too many wires and wire nut connections mean a crowded box and dangerous conditions.

Let us help you choose the right mats or cables, and you will have fewer connections and an easier, safer installation.

Can a thermostat run two mats or cables at different times/temperatures?

No, thermostats operate all mats or cables connected to them as a single system, meaning they all activate at the same time and heat to the same temperature. Even though there is a single floor sensor, it still works perfectly.

What does it mean for a thermostat to be “dual voltage”?

All the thermostats we offer are dual voltage, meaning they can be used with either 120V or 240V systems, so you never have to worry about ordering the “wrong” thermostat for an installation. The voltage from the circuit breaker must MATCH the voltage of the heating elements (mats/cables).

Can mats of different voltages be controlled by the same thermostat, since the thermostats are dual voltage?

No, dual voltage means the thermostat can be used with either a 120V or 240V system, but the voltage coming into the thermostat from the breaker must always match the voltage of the heating elements attached to the thermostat.

10 thoughts on “Thermostat FAQ’s”

    • Hello Kristina,

      Thank you for your question!

      All of the thermostats we carry are compatible across all brands of the floor warming elements we sell.

      Warm Regards,

      – The Warm Your Floor Team

    • Jacquelyn Sutterman says:

      Hi Dan,

      SunTouch pushes automatic updates directly to the units as they become available.

      Warm Regards,

      The Warm Your Floor Team

  • I am considering one 24″ x 96″ mat for our bathroom. Is 120 volt or 240 volt better.
    How long does it take to heat a 120 volt mat?

    • Jacquelyn Sutterman says:

      Hi Anne,

      There is no difference in the heat output of the 120v and 240v heating elements, so we would recommend 120v for a mat of that size. 240v is recommended only for areas over 150 square feet or if 120v is not available. The startup time of each system is different depending on the heat loss of the room, but programmable thermostats learn to compensate for that over time, so as long as you use one of those, it will not be an issue.

      Warm Regards,

      The Warm Your Floor Team

  • Can I use Nest Third Generation thermostats with your product? I have a mixed house, forced air and radiant, and would like one standard thermostat for both.

    • Jacquelyn Sutterman says:

      Hi John,

      As of right now, the only floor heating thermostat that can fully integrate with the Nest system is the Nuheat Signature. Click here to view its products page & place your order.

      Please don’t hesitate to contact us if you have any additional questions!

      Warm Regards,

      The Warm Your Floor Team

  • Regarding a new pour slab heat install – Can the thermostat sensor wire be run through the same conduit the heating cable lead runs through?

    • Jacquelyn Sutterman says:

      Hi Dave,

      No, you will need to run the power lead for the heating cable in its own conduit. The sensor wire can be run in a separate conduit or outside of the conduit since it is a low voltage wire.

      Warm Regards,

      The Warm Your Floor Team

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